Types of Horse Shoes

Questions and opinions on shoes and other horseshoe pitching accessories and equipment
User avatar
mlbruem
Senior Member
Senior Member
Posts: 85
Contact:

Re: Types of Horse Shoes

Post#16 » Tue Feb 16, 2016 2:06 pm

Snyder - Watson great FLIP SHOE

User avatar
Jarhead
Junior Member
Junior Member
Posts: 21

Re: Types of Horse Shoes

Post#17 » Tue Feb 16, 2016 5:17 pm

I like the Snyder/Watson also. Single flip lugs down at 40 feet. I have to make sure that I get the height up, so that I get a soft shoe going on the stake.
Adapt...Improvise...And Overcome...Semper Fi

RandyLJ
Senior Member
Senior Member
Posts: 178

Re: Types of Horse Shoes

Post#18 » Wed Feb 17, 2016 7:40 pm

I started using the Snyder Flip-grip this past summer. It is great, The thump notch ensures your grip is the same every time.
/*b U-U

Clank
Senior Member
Senior Member
Posts: 425
Contact:

Re: Types of Horse Shoes

Post#19 » Tue Nov 07, 2017 12:33 pm

In Horseshoes what you learn one day doesn't seem to be true the next, as many of my own posts indicate. But here is my latest discovery. I pitch my shoes holding the calks up and the flat side down. In the past I rejected a lot of shoes because holding them right side up cramped my grip. Holding them calks up puts your fingers on the flat side which results in more holding options and the ability to find a sweet spot for gripping in almost any shoe.

Does pitching shoes upside down have a down side? In sand or soil a sliding shoe seems desirable if you are pitching for ringers. Short shoes have a chance to slide onto the stake. And those that miss may as well slide on by. On hard clay a shoe hitting flat and flat side down will bounce more, but in ideal clay a shoe landing upside down will hold position just as well. A shoe landing flat and flat side down on top of a shoe flat side up will bounce more---but I believe the number of shoes that land perfectly flat on top of perfectly flat shoes is small.

In short, I don't believe that pitching shoes upside down has great disadvantages. Flippers have done it for years. Holding the shoe upside down gives more holding options on the shoes you already have and means you don't have to look as hard for the right shoes.

Shoe distributors can be thankful that my words don't carry an awfully lot of weight---because the little trick I've mentioned here makes one less inclined to seek a new shoe since there are so many ways to grip the shoes one already has.. :-?-
It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that swing !!!

LarryMac
Senior Member
Senior Member
Posts: 301

Re: Types of Horse Shoes

Post#20 » Wed Nov 08, 2017 8:56 pm

Clank wrote:In Horseshoes what you learn one day doesn't seem to be true the next, as many of my own posts indicate. But here is my latest discovery. I pitch my shoes holding the calks up and the flat side down. In the past I rejected a lot of shoes because holding them right side up cramped my grip. Holding them calks up puts your fingers on the flat side which results in more holding options and the ability to find a sweet spot for gripping in almost any shoe.

Does pitching shoes upside down have a down side? In sand or soil a sliding shoe seems desirable if you are pitching for ringers. Short shoes have a chance to slide onto the stake. And those that miss may as well slide on by. On hard clay a shoe hitting flat and flat side down will bounce more, but in ideal clay a shoe landing upside down will hold position just as well. A shoe landing flat and flat side down on top of a shoe flat side up will bounce more---but I believe the number of shoes that land perfectly flat on top of perfectly flat shoes is small.

In short, I don't believe that pitching shoes upside down has great disadvantages. Flippers have done it for years. Holding the shoe upside down gives more holding options on the shoes you already have and means you don't have to look as hard for the right shoes.

Shoe distributors can be thankful that my words don't carry an awfully lot of weight---because the little trick I've mentioned here makes one less inclined to seek a new shoe since there are so many ways to grip the shoes one already has.. :-?-

Clank I tried pitching with the calks up (1/14) and it felt strange to me. I guess with a little practice it would feel better. I think you are right about the ringers, I doubt if it makes much difference. Back to the way I have pitched for 50+ years.

User avatar
mlbruem
Senior Member
Senior Member
Posts: 85
Contact:

Re: Types of Horse Shoes

Post#21 » Thu Nov 09, 2017 10:29 am

I hear what you guys are saying regarding pitching with caulks up. The thing I would like to interject is that when pitching in classes with your equals or in the upper classes just a little difference can be the difference between a W and a L. Also if you have that one ringer bounce off that makes you 39.9 or 49.9 or 59.9 instead of 40 or 50 or 60 ouch that hurts.

LarryMac
Senior Member
Senior Member
Posts: 301

Re: Types of Horse Shoes

Post#22 » Thu Nov 09, 2017 2:29 pm

mlbruem wrote:I hear what you guys are saying regarding pitching with caulks up. The thing I would like to interject is that when pitching in classes with your equals or in the upper classes just a little difference can be the difference between a W and a L. Also if you have that one ringer bounce off that makes you 39.9 or 49.9 or 59.9 instead of 40 or 50 or 60 ouch that hurts.

Isn't it funny how a very small percent can make a difference in the way we think. I usually practice throwing 100 shoes, if I get 59% well that is all right but if I get 60% i think I am doing something and actually all I did was make one more ringer out of 100.
Larry Mac

User avatar
mlbruem
Senior Member
Senior Member
Posts: 85
Contact:

Re: Types of Horse Shoes

Post#23 » Thu Nov 09, 2017 4:09 pm


Clank
Senior Member
Senior Member
Posts: 425
Contact:

Re: Types of Horse Shoes

Post#24 » Thu Nov 09, 2017 4:15 pm

LarryMac, One day you will be offered an opportunity to pitch, but won't have your own shoes and you won't be able to get the right grip on the shoes available. Then just remember what Clank said---and flip those shoes over!
It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that swing !!!

Clank
Senior Member
Senior Member
Posts: 425
Contact:

Re: Types of Horse Shoes

Post#25 » Thu Nov 30, 2017 4:32 pm

I am now pitching my shoes right side up or flat side up. I still hold to most of what I have said about the advantages of pitching some shoes flat side down---primarily this gives you more gripping options. But the single biggest reason for changing is that I am tired of proving my ringers by digging to expose the flat side of my my shoes which extends farther than the other side. Also, it doesn't set well with opponents when you have to show them that what doesn't look at first like a ringer really is a ringer.

a bit of trivia---short shoes landing with heels toward the back of the pit are more apt to be ringers when the most protruding parts of the heels are on top of the shoe because the slope of the stake takes the stake farther out of ringer status as it goes down. However, if your shoe spends around so that the heels are facing the front of the pit it will measure better if the flat side is down since the farther down the stake the more into ringer status it becomes. :idea: But it's only fractions and cheapo ringers that are affected.
It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that swing !!!

LarryMac
Senior Member
Senior Member
Posts: 301

Re: Types of Horse Shoes

Post#26 » Fri Dec 01, 2017 10:02 am

Clank wrote:I am now pitching my shoes right side up or flat side up. I still hold to most of what I have said about the advantages of pitching some shoes flat side down---primarily this gives you more gripping options. But the single biggest reason for changing is that I am tired of proving my ringers by digging to expose the flat side of my my shoes which extends farther than the other side. Also, it doesn't set well with opponents when you have to show them that what doesn't look at first like a ringer really is a ringer.

a bit of trivia---short shoes landing with heels toward the back of the pit are more apt to be ringers when the most protruding parts of the heels are on top of the shoe because the slope of the stake takes the stake farther out of ringer status as it goes down. However, if your shoe spends around so that the heels are facing the front of the pit it will measure better if the flat side is down since the farther down the stake the more into ringer status it becomes. :idea: But it's only fractions and cheapo ringers that are affected.


Clank I am having a hard time seeing any difference if you measure the shoe up or down the points will still be the farthest point. I can see how it is easier to sight a ringer with the flat side down. The best way I have been shown to measure is with a round rod,hold one end on the point of the shoe and hinge it down the stake and if you feel a bump on the other point you have a ringer. Rich Atlas has a mock up with a peg and a shoe and you are to measure and tell if it is a ringer or not. I measured with a straight edge and I said it was not a ringer. He took a rod and showed me it was a ringer and he was right.

Clank
Senior Member
Senior Member
Posts: 425
Contact:

Re: Types of Horse Shoes

Post#27 » Fri Dec 01, 2017 10:39 am

LarryMac wrote:
Clank I am having a hard time seeing any difference if you measure the shoe up or down the points will still be the farthest point. I can see how it is easier to sight a ringer with the flat side down. The best way I have been shown to measure is with a round rod,hold one end on the point of the shoe and hinge it down the stake and if you feel a bump on the other point you have a ringer. Rich Atlas has a mock up with a peg and a shoe and you are to measure and tell if it is a ringer or not. I measured with a straight edge and I said it was not a ringer. He took a rod and showed me it was a ringer and he was right.


I like the rod idea for checking ringers---so long as you don't have a bump in the stake itself it should work. You lost me on Atlas. (who is Atlas and what is a mock up)

Many shoes slope back from the points with the points being farthest forward on the flat side. When you straight edge across the shoe and the shoe is flat side down the measurement crosses the stake about 1/8 to 3/8 farther down on the stake, and since the stake is sloped this makes a difference.
It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that swing !!!

LarryMac
Senior Member
Senior Member
Posts: 301

Re: Types of Horse Shoes

Post#28 » Fri Dec 01, 2017 2:20 pm

Clank, Rick Altis (spelled wrong last post) is very active in Mo. teaching about judging and I think holds a seminar at the World on judging. The dictionary defines mock as to imitate or mimic. He has a board with a stake and a horseshoe on the board that can be moved and then you check to see if it is a ringer or not. I think I understand about the flat being up or down when measuring. If the points were on the back side of the peg it would be better if the flat was on top as the stake gets further away the more you go down the peg so I would say it is a wash.

Return to “Gear of the Game”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest